Unfortunately, at this time, researchers and doctors have not identified a cure for cellulite, or a treatment that may permanently reverse the effects. That’s a fact. However, there are strategies you may use to temporarily reduce the appearance of cellulite, or which may halt the progression of the process. I’ll tell you about some of these strategies in the following posts, but now let’s talk about the benefits of Gelatin.

You will be surprised to hear that among other benefits, gelatin helps fight cellulite.  Gelatin is composed of amino acids found mostly in bone and connective tissue. There are multiple benefits, from improving your hair and nails, to helping joint recovery and improving digestion.

I recommend using bone broth to consume gelatin, and not a processed variety you might find at the store.

The following recipe was provided by Sally Fallon, writing for the Weston A. Price Foundation. (You could also use turkey, duck, or lamb, following the same basic directions.)

Ingredients for homemade chicken broth

1 whole free-range chicken or 2 to 3 pounds of bony chicken parts, such as necks, backs, breastbones, and wings

Gizzards from one chicken (optional)

2-4 chicken feet (optional)

4 quarts cold filtered water

2 tablespoons vinegar

1 large onion, coarsely chopped

2 carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped

3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped

1 bunch parsley

Please note the addition of vinegar. Not only are fats ideally combined with acids like vinegar, but when it comes to making broth, the vinegar helps leech all those valuable minerals from the bones into the stockpot water, which is ultimately what you’ll be eating. The goal is to extract as many minerals as possible out of the bones into the broth water. Bragg’s raw apple cider vinegar is a good choice as it’s unfiltered and unpasteurized.

Cooking Directions

There are lots of different ways to make bone broth, and there really isn’t a wrong way. You can find different variations online. Here, I’ll offer some basic directions from Sally Fallon. If you’re starting out with a whole chicken, you’ll of course have plenty of meat as well, which can be added back into the broth later with extra herbs and spices to make a chicken soup. I also use it on my salad.

  1. Fill up a large stockpot (or large crockpot) with pure, filtered water. (A crockpot is recommended for safety reasons if you have to leave home while it’s cooking.)
  2. Add vinegar and all vegetables except parsleyto the water.
  3. Place the whole chicken or chicken carcass into the pot.
  4. Bring to a boil, and remove any scum that rises to the top.
  5. Reduce the heat to the lowest setting and let simmer.
  6. If cooking a whole chicken, the meat should start separating from the bone after about 2 hours. Simply remove the chicken from the pot and separate the meat from the bones. Place the carcass back into the pot and continue simmering the bones for another 12-24 hours and follow with step 8 and 9.
  7. If cooking bones only, simply let them simmer for about 24 hours.
  8. Fallon suggests adding the fresh parsley about 10 minutes before finishing the stock, as this will add healthy mineral ions to your broth.

Remove remaining bones from the broth with a slotted spoon and strain the rest through a strainer to remove any bone fragments. Bon appétit!

 

 

 

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